Monthly Archives: July 2012

More St. Vincent.

Annie Clark on performance crowds, collaborating with David Byrne, “Krokodil”, and Arrested Development. [via YouTube]

(What a nice hat!)

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Love This Giant preorder.

You can preorder the David Byrne and St. Vincent collaborative album Love This Giant right now in the link. [Preorder here]

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Conversation with David Lynch.

A short video featuring David Lynch talking about words, ideas, and place in film. [YouTube, via A Piece of Monologue]

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Rojak: Bumper edition.

Rojak is a regular collection of assorted links as well as a bulletin summarising the week (or thereabouts) on this blog.

Hello, good morning, and welcome to an especially big edition of Rojak, since we took the weekend off last week.

Before we get started, here’s some music from Cloud Nothings as you read. [via YouTube]

Assorted

On Anne Carson’s Antigonick. [via Time’s Flow Stemmed]

Interview with Dirty Projectors, whose latest album Swing Lo Magellan is quite magnificent. [via Pitchfork]

On that topic, Alex Ross listens to Dirty Projectors too. [via Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise]

A Stephen Collins comic. [via The Guardian]

“I believe in them and the music that they will make. I love Girls and I always will. That faith overshadows the pain of saying goodbye with the eagerness to say hello, to whatever future is to come.” Saying goodbye to Girls. [via True Panther]

You can read the whole of G.K. Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday online. [via Conversational Reading]

Kafka’s torture machine from In the Penal Colony. [via A Piece of Monologue]

This is the first I’ve heard of new editions of Julio Cortázar’s Blow-Up and Hopscotch comingfrom Pantheon. [via JACKET MECHANICAL]

Photographs of Lucian Freud go on sale. [via The Telegraph]

tUnE-yArDs’ African Music Mix. [via Pitchfork]

The upcoming Flying Lotus LP, Until the Quiet Comes, features Thom Yorke on a track. [via Consequence of Sound] I remember reading that Jonny Greenwood would feature on another track as well, but I’ve lost the link.

John Gray vs. Slavoj Žižek. [via A Piece of Monologue]

Bulletin

The main feature was last week’s quick impression piece on The Dark Knight Rises.

Also on WKLC this past fortnight:

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Omnivore: Bang bang, you shot me down.

Omnivore is a regular report on some of the things that I’ve been enjoying during the week (or thereabouts).

Dirty Projectors have been on my jukebox.

Of note, I watched Ernst Lubitsch’s To Be or Not To Be last night. That movie is hilarious.

Haven’t been reading much, although I am going through a book of Alfian Sa’at plays.

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Friday Lubitsch.

A clip from Ernst Lubitsch’s 1942 film To Be or Not To Be. [via YouTube]

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Who is on the Man Booker longlist?

While Will Self is probably my favourite writer on the Man Booker Prize longlist for 2012, I must also say that it is really good to see a Malaysian writer (Tan Twan Eng) on it. [via The Telegraph]

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More Lispector.

The appearance of these four novels gives the American reader an opportunity to discover the substance behind the legend of Clarice Lispector; but it also helps to explain why that legend could thrive. If Lispector’s Brazilian readers were driven to mythologize and idolize her—Moser tells the story of one reader who, on meeting the writer, threw herself at Lispector’s feet and cried, “My goddess!”—they were only responding to an invitation that Lispector issues in her writing. These strange, paradoxical novels—which are not really novels at all, but hybrids of dramatic monologue and religious treatise—are all about the exceptionalness of their author, whose mind and character form their primary subject. Few books work so hard to give the illusion of intimate contact with their creator, and few are as unapologetically self-dramatizing. Indeed, the emotional melodrama and self-obsession of these difficult books frequently makes them sound adolescent—until their rigorous philosophical curiosity and mystical insight make them sound suddenly like the work of a Spinoza or a saint.

My friend Wei Fen passed along this piece on Jewishness and Clarice Lispector. [via Tablet]

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Edition Additions: New fiction.

new fiction

Arriving this past week were Enrique Vila-Matas’s Dublinesque and a new anthology of relatively recent Latin American fiction translated into English. The Vila-Matas turned up quite dirty and old-looking, for some reason. Hopefully I’ll be able to get it replaced!

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Helen Burns.

Back from a long weekend away from any serious typing. Hope you’re doing well. First order of business this week is to let you know that Flea has his Helen Burns EP up on a more or less pay-what-you-want scheme over in the link. [via The Silverlake Conservatory of Music] This will last till 9 August. All proceeds will go to the Conservatory. You might also get one of the vinyl sets with one of his bass strings, if they’re still available.

One of the tracks features Patti Smith, whose recently put out Banga. I had a listen to the whole thing on Saturday and I quite like it. Will definitely be listening to it some more.

Yes, it is named after the Jane Eyre character.

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