Monthly Archives: August 2012

“Duquesne Whistle”

Here is the video for “Duquesne Whistle”, off of the upcoming Bob Dylan album Tempest. [via YouTube]

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“Here, There”

There, those are the woods behind the house. Before you settled into your pose, you looked behind you to see deeply, and try and find the edge, the other side. The trees went on forever, naked, white, and staring. You look and you looked.

Here you are five and she is six. You are twenty-five and she is twenty-six. You have four children. Here she loves you; she protects you. Like a mindless brother.

You watched her hands, and walked inside them as they traveled and touched the world.

Read the whole piece by Valerie Arvidson over at Anomalous Press. [via Anomalous Press]

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“The Place Lives”

It’s 11.54p.m. where I’m at, and I’m only beginning to find time to do my own work, so let me leave you with something on my playlist. Here’s some Mount Eerie from the latest album Clear Moon. [via YouTube]

On a side note, I’ve been receiving lots of books but haven’t found the space and/or time to do a proper Edition Additions post. I’ll do one again soon.

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“… everything goes on – why? I see you, and I ask you – why?”

“… the short sentence is artificial – we use almost never short sentences, we make pause, or we hold on a part of a sentence end …” he reaches for it with his left hand as it passes “… but this characteristic, very classical, short sentence – at the end with a dot – this is artificial, this is only a custom, this is perhaps helpful for the reader, but for only one reason, that the readers in the last few thousand years have learned that a short sentence is easier to understand, this is also a custom, but if you think, you almost never use short sentences, if you listen …”

The Guardian speaks with László Krasznahorkai. [via The Guardian]

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Chris Marker retrospective.

For much of his life, Marker functioned as a foreign correspondent, a romantic leftist in the Malraux mode travelling the world from West Africa to Siberia. Most of his early films were personal travelogues—short features notable for their wry, poetic voiceover narration and serendipitous approach to foreign societies. “Modern adventure, Marker understands, is not updating lost paradises, but discovering new places,” observed Cahiers du Cinéma critic Andre S. Labarthe in 1961. “No longer the Indies, but Communist China, no longer the Amazon, but Cuba, no longer Palestine, but Israel.” Today one might call these places failed utopias—or, perhaps, in a more Markerian formulation, places haunted by their lost futures.

Hoberman on the work of Chris Marker. [via The New York Review of Books]

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Rojak: Spot the reference.

Rojak is a regular collection of assorted links as well as a bulletin summarising the week (or thereabouts) on this blog.

Assorted

Random House of Canada Limited has this new website. [via Random House of Canada Limited] It has tasty articles such as this one by Christopher Hitchens on Andy Warhol. [via Hazlitt]

I’m Ajax. I’m Odysseus. We’re best friends. [via The Paris Review]

China Miéville on the future of the novel. [via The Guardian]

Certainly, the very premise of such a poll suggests that one should probably look at it with a healthy dose of scepticism, but I found Pitchfork’s top albums of 1996-2011 largely predictable but interesting in minor places. [via Pitchfork]

Magical Mystery Tour to be restored and released this October. [via Consequence of Sound]

Aidan Higgins’s Blind Man’s Bluff seems like an interesting book. [via Totally Dublin]

Video of Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti’s “Only in my Dreams”, off of the new album Mature Themes. [via YouTube]

Bulletin

Waiting for Godot is coming to Singapore. Also:

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Omnivore: Not much going.

Omnivore is a regular report on some of the things that I’ve been enjoying during the week (or thereabouts).

Worryingly, I’ve only got busier with the second week of semester. Keeping me alive is music from Dirty Projectors, Fiona Apple, the xx, Albert Ammons, and 万能青年旅店.

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Waiting in Singapore.

Waiting for Godot comes to Singapore via ABA Productions. It will run from 10 to 13 October. Details in the link. [via ABA Productions]

[Tickets via SISTIC]

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Finding Marie Chaix.

Our next contact occurred a month later: a two-hour phone call whose pretext was the clarification of certain passages in The Laurels, in effect a chance to start knowing one another. At the end of our conversation I painfully learned how deep I had already been drawn into Marie’s world: she mentioned that her next book was an account of her mother’s life as seen from the moment of her death. This death had not been mentioned in The Laurels. I was incredulous—I had longed to meet Marie’s mother. After we hung up, I immediately fell prey to the worst migraine headache of my life, spending four hours lying on my bed in darkness and pain, from which I finally emerged as soon as I realized I was indulging in “unjustified mourning”—a passion of love and grief for someone I had never even met.

Harry Mathews on Marie Chaix. [via The Paris Review]

I could do with a love story like that in my life.

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Nobel betting.

Man, is it that time of the year again? Apparently, this year’s favourite in the betting market for the Nobel Prize for Literature is Haruki Murakami. (And I do not advocate gambling, children.) [via the Guardian] So it is time to play that game again.

So, in the spirit of playing along (as I tend to do), I will again allow myself five guesses. This year, I’m putting my non-existent money on 残雪, Cormac McCarthy, Nicanor Parra, László Krasznahorkai, and… Javier Marías.

All right, let’s do this.

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