Spoilers.

Hey, do you want to know who the literary winners are at this year’s PEN Translation Awards? Well, then, check it out in the link. I’m not going to spoil it. [via Translationista]

Yeah, this is also an excuse to link you to translator and writer extraordinaire Susan Bernofsky’s blog.

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Animation aesthetics.

My central idea in constructing the world of the film was to prove that something totally artificial and unreal could still communicate emotion and hold cinematic truth. The film makes no effort to cover up the fact that it is a computer animation, it holds an array of artefacts which distance it from reality, which tie it closer to the software it came from. This idea is in direct opposition to all current trends in animation, which take the route of desperately trying to look real, usually by realistic lighting and rendering, or by forcing a hand-made or naive appearance. At the time of writing, this trend shows no apparent signs of ceasing.

There is a model for examining animation proposed here which I found relevant to my interests. [via The White Review]

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Experimental music.

Pitchfork has a feature on experimental music records of 2013, and it’s introduced me to a couple of cool things. [via Pitchfork] Below!

[Félicia Atkinson]

[Agarttha]

Enjoy!

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Monday music.

Good evening. Please have some music by Michiyo Yagi. [via YouTube]

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Rojak: Hold it.

Rojak is a regular collection of assorted links as well as a bulletin summarising the week (or thereabouts) on this blog.

Assorted

Anna Calvi’s new album, One Breath, is coming 7 October. Here’s a trailer. [via YouTube]

Meanwhile, here’s the cover art and track list for Janelle Monáe’s The Electric Lady. [via Consequence of Sound]

Something on Beckett’s How It Is. [via The Guardian]

In search of Shakespeare’s dark lady. [via The Guardian]

So Daft Punk didn’t appear on The Colbert Report, and Colbert did this. [via Kotaku]

Meanwhile conspiracy theories abound. [via Consequence of Sound]

Dawn of Midi’s Dysnomia sounds like an interesting album. [via Pitchfork]

Bulletin

This week:

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Omnivore: Slow reader.

Omnivore is a regular report on some of the things that I’ve been enjoying during the week (or thereabouts).

I’ve been reading really slowly lately because of certain personal matters I’ve had to take care of, some writing work, and also the fact that I’ve started a new job. Nevertheless, I’ve tried to stay diligent. I read some Chinese poetry by Ming Di and have also started on a re-read of Calvino’s If on a winter’s night a traveller.

I think I’ll have to figure out how best to read given my new schedule and sleep cycle.

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P.S. Jon Hopkins’s Immunity remains fantastic.

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The Ghosts of Place.

Once more, I am standing outside of 70 High Street, Lewes. The figure in black who crossed the landing before disappearing into the brickwork is nowhere to be seen, save that of a memory that from time to time I might again experience in my body. In the moonlight, the house reveals itself in a partial glimpse. The place has a life of its own, quite apart from the manner in which it is experienced by me. And yet, without the living, there are no ghosts. If the ghost of a place resists the category of cultural symbol and is equally ill-at-ease in being a fault or excess in perception, then this does not mean it inhabits the mind alone, therefore denying its reality in the external world. Rather, something takes place between the viewer and the spectre that renders the dialogue between the living and the semi-living possible. This ambiguity is inherent in our relationship with places, be it in the ruins of an abandoned fort or in the harshly lit tunnels of a subway station at night. In each case, the genius loci reveals itself as precisely that which resists our understanding and instead constitutes a place as both the site of a haunting but also the haunt to which we return time and again.

[via The White Review]

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Borges on Johnson and Boswell.

….Now, in the same way that we have seen how Johnson is similar to Don Quixote, we have to think that just as Sancho is the companion Quixote sometimes treats badly, we see Boswell in that same relation to Dr. Johnson: a sometimes stupid and loyal companion. There are characters whose role is to bring out the hero’s personality. In other words, often authors need a character who serves as a framework for and a contrast to the deeds of his hero. This is Sancho, and that character in Boswell’s work is Boswell himself. That is, Boswell appears as a despicable character. But it seems impossible to me that Boswell didn’t realize this. And this shows that Boswell positioned himself in contrast to Johnson. The fact that Boswell himself tells anecdotes in which he appears ridiculous makes him not seem ridiculous at all, for if he wrote them down, he did it because he saw that the purpose of the anecdote was to make Johnson stand out.

New Directions are releasing Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature, which features 25 lectures by Borges translated into English for the first time, and NYRB has posted this excerpt.

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Four short stories.

Find out which are the ten countries where Shakespeare’s plays are most studied and performed. Hire gangs of professional thieves in these ten countries. Purloin from public and private libraries, slowly and discreetly, as many editions of Hamlet as possible. Send them to Araraquara. Produce facsimile versions of these books, identical in all respects to the originals, from the leather binding to the yellowed pages, but for one detail: the insertion of a line into the end of the second act, a threat by the Prince of Denmark to Claudius, his father’s murderer: “Oh, if I catch you—if I catch you, oh!” Return the adulterated copies to the libraries. Burn the originals.

Words Without Borders is having a literature of Brazil feature, and it includes this fun bit by Antônio Prata. [via Words Without Borders]

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Lynch’s strange formula.

Hey, the Ultraísta remix album is out right now, which makes it a good time to revisit David Lynch’s fantastic remix of “Strange Formula”. [via YouTube]

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